SPACE IS FILLED WITH ENERGY - NIKOLA TESLA

Posted by AnandaOm
AnandaOm
AnandaOm
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on Friday, 28 September 2012 in Anandaom

As early as 1891 Nikola Tesla (1856-1943), a genius and an inventor in the fields of electricity and wireless communications, described the universe as a kinetic system filled with energy, which could be harnessed at any location. After meeting Swami Vivekananda, Tesla began using the Sanskrit words Akasha, Prana, and the concept of a luminiferous ether to describe the source, existence and construction of matter.

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Swami Vivekanda (1863-1902) was an Indian Hindu monk and chief disciple of the 19th-century master Ramakrishna. He was a key figure in the introduction of the Indian philosophies of Vedanta and Yoga to the Western world.

Tesla made the following comments during a speech before the American Institute of Electrical Engineers:"Ere many generations pass, our machinery will be driven by a power obtainable at any point in the universe. This idea is not novel... We find it in the delightful myth of Antheus, who derives power from the earth; we find it among the subtle speculations of one of your splendid mathematicians... Throughout space there is energy. Is this energy static or kinetic.? If static our hopes are in vain; if kinetic - and this we know it is, for certain - then it is a mere question of time when men will succeed in attaching their machinery to the very wheelwork of nature."

This description of the physical mechanisms of the universe is present in the ancient scripts of India, Tibet and Nepal. Vedic philosophy defines Brahman as the Divine Essence from which all things emanate, which is very similar to the concept of the Great Spirit as understood by the Native American cultures.

Swami Vivekananda, late in the year l895 wrote in a letter to an English friend, "Mr. Tesla thinks he can demonstrate mathematically that force and matter are reducible to potential energy. I am to go and see him next week to get this new mathematical demonstration. In that case the Vedantic cosmology will be placed on the surest of foundations. I am working a good deal now upon the cosmology and eschatology of the Vedanta. I clearly see their perfect union with modern science, and the elucidation of the one will be followed by that of the other." (Complete Works, Vol. V, Fifth Edition, 1347, p. 77).

Here Swamiji uses the terms force and matter for the Sanskrit terms Prana and Akasha. Tesla used the Sanskrit terms and apparently understood them as energy and mass. In Swamiji's day, as in many dictionaries published in the first half of the present century, force and energy were not always clearly differentiated. Energy is a more proper translation of the Sanskrit term Prana. Nikola Tesla used ancient Sanskrit terminology in his descriptions of natural phenomena. As early as 1891 Tesla described the universe as a kinetic system filled with energy, which could be harnessed at any location. After meeting the Swami and after continued study of the Eastern view of the mechanisms driving the material world, Tesla began using the Sanskrit words Akasha, Prana, and the concept of a luminiferous ether to describe the source, existence and construction of matter.

Nikola Tesla's quote: “The gift of mental power comes from God, Divine Being, and if we concentrate our minds on that truth, we become in tune with this great power.”

"Everything in the universe resonates at it’s own frequency, yet they all relate on a harmonic scale to each other... Understanding my work means understanding the key to the universe, resonance."

“The desire that guides me in all I do is the desire to harness the forces of nature to the service of mankind.”

“Our senses enable us to perceive only a minute portion of the outside world.”

“Though free to think and act, we are held together, like the stars in the firmament, with ties inseparable. These ties cannot be seen, but we can feel them.”

“All that was great in the past was ridiculed, condemned, combated, suppressed - only to emerge all the more powerfully, all the more triumphantly from the struggle.”

“How extraordinary was my life an incident may illustrate... [As a youth] I was fascinated by a description of Niagara Falls I had perused, and pictured in my imagination a big wheel run by the Falls. I told my uncle that I would go to America and carry out this scheme. Thirty years later I saw my ideas carried out at Niagara and marveled at the unfathomable mystery of the mind.”




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Academy we teach the students how to use their inner energy to create.

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